Fanciful Team Handbook

(Updated June 20, 2019)

In order to devote ourselves to the utmost professionalism and the highest quality entertainment services, the staff of Feeling Fanciful, LLC, agrees to abide by this handbook and to keep ourselves updated on the latest changes and or additions to this handbook in order to consistently abide by it:

Step 1 – Company

MISSION & VISION

Feeling Fanciful empowers kids (from 1 to 92) to find hope and joy by living their dreams and unlocking their full potential by creating the most memorable, unique, stress-free fairytale party experiences in America.

USP’s

UNIQUE SELLING POINTS: 

  1. Singing Performers
  2. High-end Wigs/Costumes
  3. Devoted Party Assistants
  4. Streamlined Bookings
  5. Ongoing Team Trainings
  6. Rehearsed Party Programs

CULTURE

Feeling Fanciful fosters a culture of dreaming big and building each other up.

QUALITY vs. QUANTITY

Feeling Fanciful is devoted to providing the highest quality entertainment services.

This is reflected in our:

  • high-end costuming and wigs as well as the attentive maintenance we give them
  • time and attention invested in developing current and new additions for our portfolio
  • highly selective casting and ongoing training invested into our performers
  • attention to detail and preparation for each individual event

A single character in our portfolio often equals a $1000+ investment.  Adding characters to our library is a careful process that does not happen overnight, and we devote intensive time and attention to the care and maintenance of what already comprises our portfolio.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Making dreams come true here and halfway across the world: every time someone books a party with Feeling Fanciful, a percent of their party package goes toward making dreams come true for children halfway across the world in Liberia! LEARN MORE

Step 2 – Client Relations

BOOKINGS

Bookings are completely streamlined for our clients by offering:

  • current availability publicized clearly online for clients to view without delay
  • one-time, up-front payments to book an event through secure online checkout

FAQ’s

Team members are responsible for staying up to date with company FAQ’s.

TERMS OF SERVICE

Team members are responsible to stay up to date with company Terms of Service.

SOCIAL MEDIA

INSTAGRAM

Set up your account:

  • Visit instagram.com & select “Sign Up” for a new account
  • Enter your email or phone #
  • Enter your FULL NAME
  • Username: firstname_feelingfanciful
  • Password: fanciful[firstname] (without the brackets)
  • Settings: set account to PUBLIC & ensure “hide offensive comments” is turned ON.

Set up your profile:

  1. Web link: www.feelingfanciful.com/yourfullname
  2. Bio: this is up to you – just be sure to include the company phone # and draw attention to your web link
  3. Profile Picture: use your image from the company web site

Create your first post:

  1. Copy your bio from the company web site for the text.
  2. Use your company profile picture for the image.

Start following others: 

  1. Follow @feelingfanciful and other fanciful team member’s business and personal accounts!
  2. Follow @angelagermanyphotography & @chesleabridgmanmakeup!
  3. Follow anyone else you’d like from there!

Grow your following:

  1. Use hashtags to grow your following.
  2. Follow those who you’d like to follow you back, and invite social media friends to follow your princess profiles through your personal social media profiles.

Rules for Posting:

  1. Tag @feelingfanciful when posting your personal profiles.
  2. Only post the “postables” that have been posted to the team FB group (they will be edited and watermarked).
  3. Suggested posting schedule: MON/WED/FRI
  4. Use only company names (public domain) for your characters.
  5. Avoid directly quoting from Disney movies or other copyrighted work – “spin off’s” are great, though!
  6. NO curse words or slang or potty mouth or inappropriate humor.
  7. NO innuendos or references to things inappropriate for children.
  8. NO personal images or topics unrelated to the company.
  9. NO images including children’s faces on your personal profiles (only company profiles).
  10. NO posting where you are going before you get there (only when you are leaving). #avoidstalkers

Step 3 – Fanciful Team

MINDSET

  • We are committed to our roles as the heroes and role models to so many children, their parents, guardians, and family members.
  • We are committed to nurturing positivity, focusing on positive reenforcement in our mindsets and vocabulary.
  • We are committed to eliminating “can’t” from our vocabulary so that we can discover our dreams and unlock our potential, giving others permission to do the same.
  • We are committed to cultivating leadership within ourselves so that we become the leaders in our field or whatever occupation in which we find ourselves to make a positive difference.
  • We are committed to “playing above the point,” taking responsibility for ourselves and ignoring opportunities to complain, blame, or make excuses – acknowledging every situation as a positive opportunity.

CASTING

Performers are cast for whomever the company sees fit, and may be replaced or “uncast” as well per company standards and procedures.

COMPENSATION

  • Payroll takes place via direct deposit the 7th of each month for the previous calendar month.
  • $10/hour for quarterly rehearsals & castle attending
  • $20/event hour for party assisting
  • $60/event hour for performing
  • Team members are awarded a $10 bonus on their monthly payroll for every party booked by their referral.
  • Travel is compensated to performers only at the rate of approximately $0.50/mile one-way for events beyond our 30-mile service radius.
  • Travel fees are either paid to the performer who provided the mode of transportation to an event or split evenly among performers driving to an event separately.
  • The company is not responsible for any toll tags, parking tickets, or any other traveling fees.
  • Clients are responsible for compensating performer(s) at an event should the performer(s) have been required to pay for their parking.
  • Gratuity is optional and designated for performers only, taken home the day of an event.
  • Gratuity is split evenly among performers for events with more than one performer, and it is the performers’ responsibility to do so among each other.
  • Photoshoots are optional and unpaid.  Should the performer like to purchase or shoot promotional photos for themselves, the photographer must be approved by the company and the photos must be watermarked with the company logo.

COMMITMENT

  • Team members are free to make personal plans for a given weekend the Monday beforehand if they have not been booked.
  • Ongoing availability is set at the beginning of each calendar quarter: January, April, July, and October.  Any time-off unused from the previous semester will be added to the allowed time off for the next but will not be applied to the semester after that.
  • Team members are allowed 20 hours (OR one full weekend) of personal time off each quarter.
  • Our Time Off Request Equation (based upon 20 possible excused time off hours per quarter with complete ongoing weekend availability & 20 hours total potential hours to work each weekend):  X = number of hours unavailable to work per weekend for a single semester.  X/20 = percent of of the total possible work hours unavailable to work each weekend (Y).  (1 – Y) x 20 = total time off available per quarter.
  • Taking more time off than the excused hours allotted indicates resignation from the company.
  • Requests off due to performing arts opportunities other than character & event entertainment are permissible and do not count towards excused hours off.
  • Requests off are submitted via the Crew app, providing the reason for requesting off and precise hours request in the notes.
  • Performers take responsibility to input approved requests off in the back end of the company web site.
  • Cancelling an event booked with the company is permissible under extreme or extraordinary circumstances (such as tremendous illness, death in the family, or life tragedy). Such cancellations count towards excused hours off, and cancelling an event with the company for any other reason indicates resignation from the company.  FaceTime or a doctor’s note is necessary in order to confirm proof of sickness.

ORIENTATION

  • Team members attend one mandatory orientation & training event at the beginning of every quarter.
  • New performers first observe a party at training pay rate and then work one party as a party assistant before being made available for bookings as a performer.
  • Casting includes successfully passing an audition with the following requirements:
    • desired character song performance
    • desired character monologue
    • desired character “interview”
    • written character test
    • costume fitting

INTEGRITY

  • Serving another entertainment company or independently performing character entertainment indicates resignation from Feeling Fanciful.
  • Team members agree not to do business as a character entertainer within a 60-mile radius of the company either during employment with the company or within one year of discontinuation with the company.
  • Team members receive one complimentary company polo that is returned to the company upon discontinuation of employment.
  • Team members never use client contact information except to find event venues or perform birthday phone calls.
  • Performers refrain from making drastic changes to personal appearance (such as piercings and spray tans) without permission from the company.

ETIQUETTE

  • Team members do not bring personal drivers or companions to company events.
  • Team members keep all costuming, wigs, and accessories intact until returning to change at the “castle.”
  • Team members refrain from swearing and/or “potty mouth.”
  • Team members do their best to maintain their current measurements, as outgrowing company costumes may result in discontinuation with the company due to limited inventory.
  • Team members maintain the well being of their vehicles (oil change, tire pressure, etc.) for safe travels and keep their car seats clean to protect costuming during travel.
  • Team members keep themselves well fed and hydrated outside event performances, refraining from food or drink (except water) when in costume.
  • Team members politely decline offers of food from company clients or event guests.
  • Team members refrain from the use of dirty and/or public restrooms while in costume.
  • Team members refrain from smoking and the use of scented sprays/perfumes (except hairspray) when in company costuming.
  • Team members abide by the ZERO tolerance policy regarding alcohol and drugs: drinking alcoholic beverages, smoking, or using drugs of any kind while representing the company is strictly prohibited and results in immediate termination.

TEAMWORK

  • Team members maintain a positive, professional, and cooperative attitude towards each other.
  • Team members refrain from discussing conflicts with each other during an event and save any conflict discussions for “off stage,” outside of event times.
  • Team members ignore opportunities to complain or think negatively and instead turn those situations into positive opportunities for growth.
  • Team members refrain from critiquing each other and instead focus on complimenting each other for the various strengths each member presents.
  • Team members build up and encourage each other.
  • Team members submit Party Reports (one for each party) the Monday after each weekend to summarize their experiences and allow the company to assist them in having good experiences going forward.

SAFETY

  • Team members depart from an event should the circumstances be deemed unsafe or threatening in any way.
  • Team members find an alternative indoor venue or remove themselves from circumstances with harmful weather, smoking, or animals threatening the well-being of their costumes and/or wigs.
  • Team members never hold young ones or pick them up in order to avoid lawsuits and/or having spoiling their costume.  Should someone try to hand them a little one, team members use body language to signal a polite decline (e.g. keeping hands folded behind them) and (if a performer) encourage them to take the picture together with them instead.  Should someone hand over a little one suddenly without question, team members kneel immediately to the ground and place the child on the floor or immediately hand them back, mentioning some reason “in character” for their behavior.  For example, Rapunzel might put the child down and say, “Oh, I’ve been painting today and wouldn’t want to spoil your child’s cute clothes!” or  “I’m sure the royal portrait would look so much better with you in it!” If a parent is upset and simply does not understand, party assistants step in to give reassurance that it is “per company policy and for the safety of everyone involved.”

CORRECTION

  • Team members are liable to provide financial reimbursements to the company in full should any of the following occur while company property is under their care: costume, wig, or any other company property is broken, lost, stolen, or otherwise destroyed beyond normal wear and tear. (Exception: should it be determined that the client is responsible for the damage, the client is held liable for the damages.)
  • The company use a written warning system.  Violation of the handbook or contract agreements in any way can warrant a written warning.  Some violations are strong enough to warrant immediate termination.
  • Three written warnings is equivalent to termination.
  • Warnings or termination of employment may be caused by any of the following reasons (including but not limited to):
    • tardiness
    • poor hygiene
    • rudeness
    • breaking character
    • failing to submit Performer’s Checklist the Friday before an event
    • evident lack of preparation (e.g. forgetting words to a song performance, skipping services in the timeline such as a Birthday Phone Call, overlooking Event Details, etc.)
    • violating character appearance requirements on character cheat sheets
    • company reimbursing client on account of a team member for any reason
    • eating or drinking (anything other than water) while in costume
    • neglecting proper care of costuming and wigs, etc.
    • not showing up to or forgetting a party (automatic termination)

COPYRIGHT

  • Team members understand that the company does not violate any copyright laws, that our characters are not name brand or copyrighted characters, that our characters are generic and that we only accept bookings from individuals who are aware that we do not represent any licensed character.
  • Team members agree not to promote any company character as a copyrighted or licensed character but only as generic public domain storybook and fairytale characters, using company character names (public domain names).

Step 4 – Performers

COSTUME & COSMETICS

  • Performers maintain good hygiene and grooming, presenting themselves professionally for each event: clean shaven, eyebrows threaded, nails up-kept and polished per character requirements, showered, teeth brushed, undergarments washed, fresh deodorant.
  • Performers wear wigs, costumes, accessories, makeup, nail polish, undergarments, and shoes as prescribed on the character cheat sheets (including jewelry requirements).
  • Performers wear makeup “theatrically” according to character requirements.
  • Performers use sufficient foundation/concealer to cover any visible tattoos, breakouts, or blemishes.
  • Performers travel with their “princess survival kit”: deodorant, safety pins, bobby pins, wig pins, hairspray, lip stick, eyelash glue, water bottle, phone charger, contact solution, makeup wipes, and tissues.
  • Performers rehang costumes on the costume rack with the back open so that they can “air out” after an event, leaving the garment bag unzipped.
  • Performers notify the company of any damaged costuming or wigs right away.

PARTY PREPARATION

  • Performers are required to complete and submit their Performer’s Checklist the Friday before a weekend in which they perform.
  • Performers abide by the company’s packaged event agenda for every event.
  • Performers remain “in character” for the entire length of an event and maintain a never-ending smile throughout.
  • Performers arrive “wig-ready” in full makeup at the “castle” 30 min. before departure time in order to dress in full costume, review party kit and storybook, pack the vehicle, etc. (In case of rain, performers simply pick up their costume/wigs/party kit from the “castle” and immediately take those 30 min. to the venue where they change on site.)
  • Performers plan an extra 15 minutes for commute time using Google Maps to plan for traffic, arriving early, finding the best parking, prepping the Bluetooth speaker, walking to the venue, etc.
  • Performers listen to their character playlist and sing along with character songs when traveling to a party.
  • Performers contact both the company and the client immediately if discovering they will be late on account of an emergency.
  • Performers are punctual and reliable, understanding timeliness is imperative to royalty.
  • Performers arrive to each event early, vocally warmed up, and well-fed/hydrated.
  • Performers park a safe distance out of sight from the venue to avoid spoiling the magic.

PARTY EXECUTION

  • Performers immediately request the birthday princess to hug and greet her upon arriving to a party, promptly learning all of the children’s names.
  • Performers remain “camera conscious” throughout a party, creating good picture moments for the parents by holding poses long enough to allow a good shot and by keeping light shining onto them (not coming from behind them).
  • Performers make it a priority to make eye contact with every single child in the room, while giving special attention to the birthday child.
  • Performers keep engaging the children and event guests as top priority, allowing party assistants to handle every “out of character” matter involved.
  • Performers treat their party assistants with respect and never directly tell them what to do.
  • Performers work together and never compete for the “limelight” when performing events together, keeping open communication with each other throughout the event.
  • Performers are kind and patient with all children, guests, party assistants, and fellow performers.
  • Performers keep a smile as a permanent “go to” during events.
  • Performers arrive on time and never leave early, even if it means repeating a song, creating more photo ops, or simply spinning tales “in character!”
  • Performers deliver all party program or meet & greet services as specified by the company.
  • Performers always give the birthday girl one last hug and thank the client (not just the birthday girl) for having them upon departing an event.

TECHNICALITIES

  • Performers always keep torso upright and take a knee in order to get on the children’s level instead of bending down at the waist to connect with them.
  • Performers are always “costume conscious,” picking up skirts and staying aware of their surroundings or anything that might spoil the wig and costume materials.
  • If a child is ominously about to step all over a costume, performers may hold their wrist and twirl them around to keep them away, especially if their hands and face are dirty – making it a game and then twirling themselves.  Performers can also tuck the dress up closer to themselves, without allowing the outside of the skirt to brush the ground or shoes.
  • Performers continuously socialize while “in character” throughout each event and use a smile as their “go-to” all the while.  When in doubt, they can always laugh in character.
  • Performers always think in “positive” terms and never say “no.”
  • Performers find a positive way to divert from behaviors, requests, or questions that might take away from the party or spoil the “magic.” (e.g. If a child asks an antagonistic question that threatens to spoil the magic, performers could pretend they didn’t hear them and instantly suggest a new game or story, as if the idea had just come to mind as the greatest thing ever.)
  • Performers are not babysitters, but solely entertainers. While the client has agreed to stay in the same room at all times to supervise the children and handle any disruptive behavior, it is up to the performer to divert attention from negative energies and convert them to positive opportunities.
  • Performers politely refer clients to their party assistants during a party if a client tries to give them cash in front of the children. They collect their tip money from the party assistant when out of sight from the children to avoid spoiling the magic.

MAKEUP BRAND SUGGESTIONS

Princess Party Makeup Kit:

Moisturizer:  Depends on your skin type. If you’re oily find a moisturizer that is good for oily skin

  • Garnier SkinActive refreshing Gel Cream (Walmart, Walgreens, Target)
  • Cetaphil moisturizing lotion (Walmart, Walgreens, Target)
  • Clinique dramatically different moisturizing lotion. (Ulta, Sephora)

Primer: Again, know your skin type. If you’re oily get a primer suited for combating oily skin, if you’re dry look for primers that will moisturize your dry skin.

  • Maybelline Master Prime (Walmart, Target, Walgreens etc.)
  • Milani Prime Perfection (Walmart, Target, Walgreens, etc.)
  • Benefit Cosmetics Porefessional face primer (Ulta, Sephora)
  • Smashbox Photo Finish Primer (Ulta, Sephora)

Foundation: These are some of the best long wearing foundations:

  • Wet n Wild Photofocus (Walmart, Target, Walgreens etc.)
  • L’Oreal Infallible Pro-Glow OR Pro-Matte (depending on your skin type) (Walmart, Target, Walgreens, etc.)
  • Milani Conceal+Perfect (Walmart, Target, Walgreens etc.)

Powder: This is to set your liquid foundation:

  • Wet n Wild Photofocus Pressed Powder (Walmart, Target, Walgreens etc.)
  • Airspun loose face powder (Walmart, Walgreens)
  • RCMA no color powder (Amazon)

Blush: I would recommend getting a blush palette that has multiple shades.

  • BH Cosmetics Nude Blush Pallet (online only. bhcosmetics.com)
  • Morphe Cool Pro Blush Palette (online only. morphebrushes.com)

Highlighter: This is not really a necessary step but if you want to go the extra mile 😉

  • Wet n Wild Precious Petals
  • Milani strobelight instant glow afterglow
  • Pixi by Petra Santorini Sunset (Target)

Lipstick: I would recommend a liquid lipstick that dries down matte finish. I’ve found these to be extremely long wearing:

  • Wet n Wild MegaLast Liquid Catsuit
  • Colourpop Liquid Lipsticks (online only, it’d be best to find a bundle of colors you like, and buy the whole set colourpop.com

Brows: I love brow pencils. I find them the easiest to work with. But I’ll give you some options I like:

  • NYX micro brow pencil (Target, Ulta)
  • BH Cosmetics Studio Pro Ultimate brow palette *recommended since you’ll need to match different shades to different wig colors. (bhcosmetics.com)

Eye Shadow: I would recommend getting a palette full of pretty colors, and “transition shades” (I’ll explain what that means another time)

  • Morphe Jaclyn Hill Palette *RECOMMENDED* (Morphebrushes.com, Ulta)
  • Morphe 35B color burst palette (morphebrushes.com)

Eye Liner: I find felt tip liner pens to be the easiest to work with but, with practice, you’ll find what works best for you.

  • NYX Epic Ink Liner (Ulta, Target)
  • NYX Matte Liquid Liner (Ulta, Target)
  • Maybelline Eye Studio gel pot liner (Walmart, Target, Ulta, Walgreens etc.)

Mascara: I only have 2 options, both amazing. (Buy the waterproof version if your eyes water easily)

  • L’oreal Voluminous Carbon Black
  • Maybelline Great Lash (pink tube, lime green lid we all know it)

Lashes: Remember with lashes, they always LOOK bigger in the packaging than they actually do on your eye. So, the bigger they look off the better. I’d recommend getting pairs that are thick, and more spread out. You don’t want a “natural” looking lash for your princess parties. The more dramatic the better, I’d say.

  • Koko Lashes style: “Queen B”, “Risqué”, “Diva” **I know these are pricy lashes but, IF you take care of them, you can get multiple wears out of them. (online only, ladymoss.com)
  • Salon Perfect in style #615 (Walgreens, Ulta)
  • Ardell “Demi Wispies” these aren’t as dramatic but they will work.  (Target, Ulta, Walgreens)
  • KISS Looks so Natural style #62643

Setting Spray: This is an important step, it will help to keep your makeup on during your entire event

  • Maybelline Master Fix
  • Milani Make it last
  • Morphe Continuous setting mist (morphebrushes.com, Ulta)

Brushes:  

  • Morphe brush set # 694 (morphebrushes.com) OR BH Cosmetics 18 pc. Rose Gold brush set

Step 5 – Party Assistants

PARTY PREPARATION

  • Party Assistants wear company polos to each event.
  • Party Assistants familiarize themselves with the Event Details and Character Cheat Sheet materials before an event in order to best support the princess.
  • Party Assistants arrive to each event well-fed and hydrated 15 min. early in order to assist the performer(s) in unloading, fixing costume, makeup, and/or wig, clocking them in and out, and reviewing the party kit.
  • Party Assistants clock performer(s) in and out by texting photos of them to the company upon arriving to and departing from an event.

PARTY EXECUTION

Party Assistants are responsible for the following during an event:

  • every “out of character” matter involved
  • staying out of the way of the client and their guests
  • anticipating the needs of the princess and proactively preparing for each activity
  • cueing karaoke tracks and managing music volume to support the party flow
  • setting up and breaking down party activities
  • unloading and then returning all party props to the party kit
  • keeping the performer(s) informed of the passing of time
  • following the performer(s) lead throughout the party
  • assisting the princess with hosting games and activities when necessary
  • making helpful suggestions (in question form) should it be helpful to the performer(s)
  • staying in communication with the princess and client to ensure positive outcome
  • answering any questions about the company and/or performer(s)
  • taking good photos and texting them to the company
  • dispersing company brochures and performer business cards to potential clients (typically during picture time)
  • requesting the client return to the party should the performer be left alone with the children
  • helping the performer(s) stay “costume conscious” and keeping them aware of pot holes, puddles, chocolate fountains, etc.
  • helping the performer(s) with any costume/makeup/wig malfunctions during the party
  • asking the client if they would like to purchase overtime should the party be running over per client request
  • assisting the client with purchasing their overtime through the company web site before departing from the event

TECHNICALITIES

  • Party Assistants do not critique or direct performer(s) in any way before, during, or after an event.
  • Party Assistants never to refer to the performer by anything other than their character name.
  • Party Assistants assist the client in any way they ask.
  • Party Assistants keep a permanent smile as their “go-do” for all events.
  • Party Assistants assist the performer(s) in leaving on time by giving character reasons why they can stay no longer stay and have to depart for their kingdom or go celebrate another special princess right away.
  • Party Assistants thank the client for having Feeling Fanciful at their party upon departing an event.

Step 6 – Package Delivery

PARTY TIMELINES

WISHFUL WHIMSY (60 min)

  • Ice Breakers (5 min)
  • Coronation, Lessons, Empowerment (5 min)
  • Storytime & Song (10 min)
  • Dance, Parade, Pixie Wishes (5 min)
  • Themed Games (20 min)
  • Royal Portraits, Cake Cutting (5 min)
  • Song Performance (5 min)
  • Farewells (5 min)

FANCIFUL FAIRYTALE (90 min)

  • Ice Breakers (5 min)
  • Coronation, Lessons, Empowerment (5 min)
  • Storytime & Song (10 min)
  • Dance, Parade, Pixie Wishes (5 min)
  • Themed Games (25 min)
  • Royal Portraits, Cake Cutting (5 min)
  • Glitter Tattoos (25 min)
  • Song Performance (5 min)
  • Farewells (5 min)

MAGICAL MERMAID (120 min)

  • Ice Breakers (5 min)
  • Coronation, Lessons, Empowerment (5 min)
  • Storytime & Song (10 min)
  • Dance, Parade, Pixie Wishes (5 min)
  • Mermaid Splash (5 min)
  • Themed Pool Play & Games (60 min)
  • Royal Portraits, Cake Cutting (5 min)
  • Glitter Tattoos (20 min)
  • Farewells (5 min)

ICE BREAKERS

CORONATION

CORONATION CEREMONY VIDEO

CORONATION CEREMONY

(to the crowd) Can I have your attention please? We have gathered here today to celebrate the very special birthday of _____(child’s name)

(to the child) Are you ready to recite your princess vow and become and honorary princess? Repeat after me:

I promise, to be kind.
I promise, to be generous.
I promise, to obey the king and queen.
I promise, to be a friend to those in need.
I am a princess. (applause)

Behold, thy crown of grace & beauty,
which is thy right and royal duty.
I now pronounce you, Princess __________(child’s name).

(applause)
(to the audience)

Everyone, repeat after me:

Health to the princess!
Wealth to the princess!
Long live the princess ____________(child’s name)!

(applause)

Now that you’re a royal princess, shouldn’t we teach you and your friends how to be real princesses?

PRINCESS LESSONS

PRINCESS LESSONS VIDEO

PRINCESS LESSONS

After each one, have them turn around and show what they’ve learned.  Then, once they’ve learned everything, create a sequence and put it all together – have them show off and be sure to praise them!

  • Royal Wave
  • Twirl
  • Curtesy (or bow)
  • Blow kisses (to spread love and kindness)
  • Sequence – wave, twirl, curtesy, blow kisses
  • Manners – “please” “thank you” “you’re welcome”

PRINCESS EMPOWERMENT

SONG PERFORMANCES

PRINCESS PARADE

PIXIE WISHES

ROYAL PORTRAITS

THEMED GAMES

CAKE CUTTING

FACEPAINT FUN

BIRTHDAY PHONE CALL

FAIRY PARTY TWISTS

FAIRY PARTY TWISTS VIDEO

FAIRY VOW

(to the crowd) Can I have your attention please? We have gathered here today to celebrate the very special birthday of _____(child’s name)

(to the child) Are you ready to recite your fairy vow and become an honorary fairy? Repeat after me:

I promise, to be kind.
I promise, to generous.
I promise, to make the world a beautiful place.
I promise to bring smiles to every face.
I am a fairy. (applause) 

(pronounce this over them)
Born of laughter,
Clothed in cheer,
Happiness has brought you here.
Welcome to the honorary fairies!

(bestow honorary wings)

FAIRY LESSONS

  • Smile (to spread joy and cheer)
  • Tip Toe Walk
  • Twirl & Skip
  • Review fairy talents (from Fairy Encyclopedia)
  • Pick your fairy talent
  • Pick your fairy name
  • Circle up, hold hands, and repeat “I Do Believe In Fairies!” 3 times together
  • Close eyes and think happy thoughts

FAIRY EMPOWERMENT

  • Sharing happy thoughts

SUPERHERO PARTY TWISTS

SUPERHERO PARTY TWISTS VIDEO

SUPERHERO LESSONS

(to the crowd) Can I have your attention please? We have gathered here today to celebrate the very special birthday of _____(child’s name)

(to the child) Are you ready to recite your superhero vow and become and honorary superhero? Repeat after me:

  • Stretch Arms & Legs
  • Reach High & Reach Low
  • Jumping Jacks
  • Run in Place
  • Punches 
  • Kicks
  • Combinations

SUPERHERO VOW

I promise, to be brave.
I promise, to be kind.
I promise, to respect those in command.
I promise, to lend a helping hand.
I am a hero. (applause)

Now take your cape.

May you be bold and brave!

WAYFINDER PARTY TWISTS

WAYFINDER PARTY TWISTS VIDEO

WAYFINDER CORONATION

(to the crowd) Can I have your attention please? We have gathered here today to celebrate the very special birthday of _____(child’s name)

(to the child) Are you ready to recite your Wayfinder vow and become and honorary Wayfinder? Repeat after me:

WAYFINDER VOW

I promise, to be brave.
I promise, to be kind.
I promise, to protect my people and friends.
I promise, to care for the earth’s many lands.
I am a Wayfinder. (applause)

Here is your lei of grace & bravery which is your right and tribal duty.  I hereby proclaim you “Wayfinder ___!”

WAYFINDER LESSONS

Now that you’re a Wayfinder, don’t you and your friends want to learn how to be one?

  • Map the stars
  • Row your boat
  • Scare the Kakamoras
  • Hula steps (see video below)

HULA DANCE TUTORIAL VIDEO 

COSTUMING & WIG USAGE

MEET & GREETS

Step 7 – Character Cheat Sheets

ALICE

CHARACTER STUDY

CHARACTER TEST

POSES (or view web site)

MEET & GREETS:

Video 1

Video 2

Video 3

Video 4

Video 5

SONGS (these are the karaoke tracks we use – practice first with the demos in the Online Resources of your Siren Singers accounts):

Home

In a World of My Own

Once More I Can See

Finding Wonderland

Very Good Advice (Broadway Jr.) – see demo in your Siren Singers account or request track via email

ACCESSORIES:

  1. Black Hair Bow

COSTUME:

  1. Alice Dress
  2. White Apron
  3. White Socks
  4. Undershorts
  5. Black Character Shoes

COSMETICS:

  1. Foundation (natural)
  2. Powder (natural)
  3. 3-toned Shadow (browns)
  4. Eyebrow Pencil (blonde)
  5. Lip Color (light pink)
  6. Nails (Nude Polish or French Tips)
  7. Contacts (blue)
  8. Black Eyeliner
  9. Black Mascara
  10. Black False Lashes (extra long)
  11. Pink Blush
  12. Contour (Intense Highlights)

GAMES:

  1. Pass the Mad Hatter’s Hat
  2. You’re Here, You’re Here, You’re Late
  3. Find the Cheshire Cat
  4. Pin the Grin on the Cheshire Cat, Pin the Teacup on the Saucer, Pin the Tail on the White Rabbit
  5. Musical Statues
  6. Alice, Alice, who has the Key/Hat?
  7. Make the Cheshire Cat Smile
  8. Alice Says
  9. Princess, May I?
  10. Princess Limbo
  11. Princess Trivia
  12. Princess Puzzles
  13. Coloring Pages

IMPROV QUESTIONS:

  1. What is your favorite kind of tea?
  2. Has the Queen of Hearts cut off anyone’s head lately?
  3. Do you live in Wonderland?
  4. What color are the roses right now?

AMAZON PRINCESS

CHARACTER STUDY:

General

2017 Film Character

Character Analysis

DC Comics Details

CHARACTER TEST

POSES (or view web site) 

SONGS (these are the karaoke tracks we use – practice first with the demos in the Online Resources of your Siren Singers accounts):

Roar

Firework

Who Says

ACCESSORIES:

  1. Headband
  2. Arm Bands
  3. Shoulder Band
  4. Harness
  5. Fingerless Gloves
  6. Shield

COSTUME:

  1. Strapless Bra
  2. Amazon Princess Corset
  3. Amazon Princess Skirt
  4. Black Boy Shorts/Dance Shorts/Briefs
  5. Red Heeled Knee-High Amazon Princess Boots

COSMETICS:

  1. Foundation (natural)
  2. Powder (natural)
  3. 3-toned Shadow (browns)
  4. Eyebrow Pencil (black)
  5. Lip Color (reddish brown)
  6. Nails (Nude Polish)
  7. Contacts (brown)
  8. Black Eyeliner
  9. Black Mascara
  10. Black False Lashes (extra long)
  11. Contour

GAMES

Resource 1

Resource 2

  1. Kryptonite Crash
  2. Kryptonite Relay
  3. Bean Bag Attack
  4. Catch the Villain
  5. Superhero Tag
  6. Green Balloon Stomp
  7. Find the Villain (Hide & Seek)
  8. Pin the Mask on the Hero
  9. Hero, Hero, Villain
  10. Wonder Woman Says

IMPROV QUESTIONS:

  1. Are you stronger than Batman?
  2. Can you speak in one of your other languages?
  3. How did you get your name?
  4. Can you show me your lasso of truth?
  5. Are you stronger than Superman?
  6. Where do you live?
  7. How did you get here?
  8. How did you get your powers?
  9. Can you fly right now so I can see?
  10. Where’s superman?
  11. Are you wearing fake armor?
  12. How come you couldn’t sing in the movie but now you can?
  13. Can you show me your lasso?
  14. Are you wearing a wig?
  15. Can you show me how to fly?

ARABIAN PRINCESS

CHARACTER STUDY

CHARACTER TEST

POSES (or view web site) 

STORYBOOK

MEET & GREETS:

Video 1

Video 2

Video 3

Video 4

Video 5

SONGS (these are the karaoke tracks we use – practice first with the demos in the Online Resources of your Siren Singers accounts):

These Palace Walls

A Whole New World

ACCESSORIES:

  1. Turquoise Headband
  2. Gold Sparkle Triangle Dangly Earrings

COSTUME:

  1. Turquoise Arabian Outfit
  2. Turquoise or Nude Under-Tanktop
  3. Gold Sparkly Flats

COSMETICS:

  1. Foundation (natural)
  2. Powder (natural)
  3. 3-toned Shadow (browns)
  4. Eyebrow Pencil (black)
  5. Lip Color (reddish brown)
  6. Nails (Nude Polish)
  7. Contacts (brown)
  8. Black Eyeliner
  9. Black Mascara
  10. Black False Lashes (extra long)
  11. Bronzey Blush
  12. Bronzer
  13. Contour

GAMES

  1. Pass the Magic Lamp
  2. Dirty, Dirty, Diamond
  3. Hide & Seek with Rajah
  4. Musical Carpet
  5. Pin the Genie on the Lamp
  6. Musical Statues
  7. Jasmine, Jasmine, who has got your lamp?
  8. Jasmine Says
  9. Princess, May I?
  10. Princess Limbo
  11. Princess Trivia
  12. Princess Puzzles
  13. Coloring Pages

IMPROV QUESTIONS:

  1. Is Jafar still in the lamp?
  2. Do Raja and Abu get along?
  3. Does Genie come back?
  4. Is Aladdin the King?
  5. How do you get your hair so big?
  6. Where is Raja?
  7. How old is Raja?
  8. Have you traveled on the magic carpet?
  9. Where have you been recently?
  10. Where’s Genie/Aladdin/Abu?
  11. Where’s the magic carpet that brought you here?
  12. What’s your favorite thing to do?
  13. Where do you go when you’re sad?
  14. Do you still live in the palace?
  15. What will happen if Jafar gets out of the lamp?
  16. How is raja and Abu doing?
  17. Why do you wear the same outfit?
  18. Where’s your magic carpet?
  19. Where’s your favorite place you and Aladdin have traveled?
  20. Where’s Genie?
  21. Do Abu and rajah get along?
  22. Where is your mom?
  23. What happened to Jafar?
  24. Where is Abu?
  25. Do you still go out on adventures?
  26. Now that Aladdin lives with you, do you want to get out of the palace walls?
  27. Can I have a ride on your magic carpet?
  28. Why don’t you cut your hair?

BEAUTY

CHARACTER STUDY

CHARACTER TEST

CHARACTER POSES (or view web site)

STORYBOOK

MEET & GREETS:

Video 1

Video 2

Video 3

Video 4

Video 5

Video 6

Video 7

SONGS (these are the karaoke tracks we use – practice first with the demos in the Online Resources of your Siren Singers accounts):

A Change In Me

Beauty & The Beast

ACCESSORIES:

  1. Yellow Hair Ribbon
  2. Yellow Gloves
  3. Beauty Clip-on Earrings

COSTUME:

  1. Yellow Rose Gown
  2. 7 Hoop Skirt
  3. Undershorts and/OR
  4. White Tights
  5. Gold Flats OR
  6. Gold Character Shoes

COSMETICS:

  1. Foundation (natural)
  2. Powder (natural)
  3. 3-toned Shadow (golds & browns)
  4. Eyebrow Pencil (brown)
  5. Lip Color (Brownish Pinks/Reds)
  6. Nails (Nude Polish or French Tips)
  7. Contacts (Brown)
  8. Black Eyeliner
  9. Black Mascara
  10. Black False Lashes (extra long)
  11. Rosie Blush
  12. Contour

GAMES:   PART 1 – https://www.facebook.com/heidiannhood/videos/2012647822328771/ / PART 2 – https://www.facebook.com/heidiannhood/videos/2012671722326381/

  1. Pass the Enchanted Rose
  2. Beauty, Beauty, Beast
  3. Find the Magic Rose
  4. Pin the Rose on Beauty
  5. Musical Statues
  6. Beauty, Beauty, who has got your mirror?
  7. Beauty Says
  8. Princess, May I?
  9. Princess Limbo
  10. Princess Trivia
  11. Princess Puzzles
  12. Coloring Pages 

IMPROV QUESTIONS:

  1. Can you speak French? (learn the French words for hello, goodbye, thank you, etc.)
  2. Gaston died, right?
  3. Do Cogsworth and Lumiere fight a lot?
  4. What is your papa doing?
  5. What is your papa’s newest invention?
  6. What is your favorite part about the enchanted castle?
  7. What does Prince Adam do now that he’s human?
  8. Do you live at the castle?
  9. Where is Gaston now?
  10. What book are you reading now?
  11. When is your birthday?
  12. Are you allowed in the West Wing now?
  13. Was the West Wing redecorated?
  14. What’s your favorite part of the castle?
  15. What is Prince Adam reading?
  16. Do you still read books together?
  17. Who is your favorite friend in the castle?
  18. Do you miss your Dad?
  19. What’s your favorite invention your dad made before?
  20. When the beast turned into a prince how did you feel?
  21. Why do you like roses?
  22. Why did you fall in love with the beast?
  23. Did you have to get new furniture?
  24. Do you still visit the village?
  25. Are the village people nicer now?

CINDERELLA

CHARACTER STUDY

CHARACTER TEST

POSES (or view web site)

STORYBOOK

MEET & GREETS:

Video 1

Video 2

Video 3

Video 4

Video 5

Video 6

Video 7

SONGS (these are the karaoke tracks we use – practice first with the demos in the Online Resources of your Siren Singers accounts):

A Dream Is A Wish

Bibbidi Bobbidi Boo

In My Own Little Corner

A Lovely Night

Strong

ACCESSORIES:

  1. Blue Headband
  2. White Long Gloves
  3. Black Choker
  4. Blue Bow
  5. Cinderella Clip-on Earrings

COSTUME:

  1. Blue Ball Gown
  2. 6 Petti Hoop Skirt
  3. Undershorts and/OR
  4. White Tights
  5. Silver Glittery Character Shoes

COSMETICS:

  1. Foundation (natural)
  2. Powder (natural)
  3. 3-toned Shadow (blues)
  4. Eyebrow Pencil (tan)
  5. Lip Color (pinks)
  6. Nails (Nude Polish or French Tips)
  7. Contacts (blue)
  8. Black Eyeliner
  9. Black Mascara
  10. Black False Lashes (extra long)
  11. Rosie Blush
  12. Contour

GAMES

  1. Pass the Magic Pumpkin
  2. Carriage, Carriage Pumpkin
  3. Hide & Seek w/Gus Gus
  4. Pin the Crown on the Princess
  5. Fairy Godmother Dance
  6. Prince Charming & Cinderella Chase
  7. Wicked Step Mother vs. Fairy Godmother
  8. Cinderella, Cinderella, who has got your mouse?
  9. Princess, May I?
  10. Princess Limbo
  11. Princess Trivia
  12. Princess Puzzles
  13. Coloring Pages

IMPROV QUESTIONS:

  1. Do you like living in the castle?
  2. How often do you see your Fairy Godmother?
  3. Have Gus & Jaq done anything silly lately?
  4. Do your step sisters live at the castle?
  5. Is your step mother still evil?
  6. Does Lucifer get along with the mice?
  7. Did Lucifer die?
  8. How do you talk to animals?
  9. Favorite chore
  10. Least favorite chore
  11. Do you still clean at the palace?
  12. Do you have your own maids now?
  13. Do the mice live at the palace?
  14. Do you like your stepmother and stepsisters?
  15. What is it like to live in a castle?
  16. Do you see your step sister or step mother?
  17. Do you still clean now that you live in a castle?
  18. Why were your step sisters so mean?
  19. Do you still play with Gus Gus and Jack?
  20. Where is your fair god mother?
  21. Do I have a fairy god mother?
  22. Where did you learn to dance?
  23. Has your fairy godmother made you anything lately?

MERMAID

CHARACTER STUDY

CHARACTER TEST 

POSES (or view web site) 

STORYBOOK

MEET & GREETS:

Video 1

Video 2

Video 3

Video 4

Video 5

SONGS (these are the karaoke tracks we use – practice first with the demos in the Online Resources of your Siren Singers accounts):

Part of Your World

Beyond My Wildest Dreams

The World Above

ACCESSORIES:

  1. Turquoise Sea Star

COSTUME:

  1. Turquoise Ball Gown
  2. 6 Petti Hoop Skirt
  3. Undershorts OR
  4. White Tights
  5. Nude Flats OR
  6. Nude Character Shoes OR
  7. Gold or Silver Character Shoes

COSMETICS:

  1. Corsette or Strapless Bra
  2. Foundation (natural)
  3. Powder (natural)
  4. 3-toned Shadow (greens)
  5. Eyebrow Pencil (red)
  6. Lip Color (cherry red)
  7. Nails (Nude Polish or French Tips)
  8. Contacts (green)
  9. Black Eyeliner
  10. Black Mascara
  11. Black False Lashes (extra long)
  12. Rosie Blush
  13. Contour

GAMES:

  1. Pass the Slippery Flounder
  2. Fins, Fins, Feet
  3. Hide & Seek w/Flounder
  4. Pin the Fins on the Mermaid
  5. Musical Statues
  6. Bubble Play
  7. Ariel, Ariel, who has got your dinglehopper?
  8. Mermaid Says
  9. Mermaid Bingo
  10. Princess, May I?
  11. Princess Limbo
  12. Princess Trivia
  13. Princess Puzzles
  14. Coloring Pages

IMPROV QUESTIONS:

  1. How do you talk to fish?
  2. Where are all the other mermaids?
  3. Can I be a real mermaid too?
  4. Can you change into a mermaid whenever you want?
  5. What do fish eat?
  6. Where is your dad?
  7. What does Prince Eric do?
  8. Why is Flounder not talking?
  9. Do you miss the ocean?
  10. How did it feel to get turned into a human?
  11. What’s your favorite part of being human?
  12. Did you used to sleep in your dad’s bed when you were scared?
  13. Now do you sleep with Prince Eric?
  14. Don’t you have a daughter?
  15. How old are you?
  16. How can you breathe underwater?
  17. Where is your daughter Melody??
  18. Do you turn back into a mermaid when you get wet?
  19. What is Prince Eric up to today?
  20. Has Scuttle found any new thingamabobs lately?
  21. What is your favorite part about having human legs?
  22. Did you still collect stuff?
  23. Do you still sing with your sisters?
  24. Are you a vegetarian?
  25. Do you prefer sea or land?
  26. What does Eric like to do?
  27. If you are a human now can you still go underwater to see your family?
  28. Does flounder live in your castle with you?
  29. What is the silliest human invention have you found so far?
  30. Do any of your mersisters ever visit you on land as humans?
  31. Does prince Eric still eat seafood?
  32. Is Ursula’s lair still there? 

PERFECT NANNY

CHARACTER STUDY

CHARACTER TEST

MEET & GREETS:

Video 1

Video 2

Video 3

Video 4

Video 5

Video 6

SONGS (these are the karaoke tracks we use – practice first with the demos in the Online Resources of your Siren Singers accounts):

ACCESSORIES:

  1. Cherry Blossom Hat
  2. White Lace Gloves
  3. Parrot Umbrella
  4. Carpet Bag

COSTUME:

  1. Red Victorian Dress
  2. Black Tights
  3. Black Lace-Up Boots

COSMETICS:

  1. Foundation (natural)
  2. Powder (natural)
  3. 3-toned Shadow (browns)
  4. Eyebrow Pencil (brown)
  5. Lip Color (brilliant red)
  6. Nails (Nude Nail Polish or French tips)
  7. Contacts (brown)
  8. Black Eyeliner
  9. Black Mascara
  10. Black False Lashes (extra long)
  11. Rosie Blush
  12. Contour

GAMES:

  1. Nanny, May I?
  2. Musical Chimneys
  3. Feed the Birds Beanbag Toss
  4. Find the Magic Carpet Bag
  5. Spoonful of Sugar Relay
  6. Jolly, Jolly, Holiday
  7. Pin the Cherries on the Hat

PROPS: 

  1. Storybook(s)
  2. Puzzles
  3. Pin the Cherries Props
  4. Magic Carpetbag
  5. Magic Umbrella
  6. Tuppins Bag
  7. Coloring Pages
  8. Spoonfuls of Sugar

PIXIE FAIRY

CHARACTER STUDY

CHARACTER TEST

POSES (or view web site)

STORYBOOK

MEET & GREETS:

Video 1

Video 2

Video 3

Video 4

Video 5

Video 6

Video 7

SONGS (these are the karaoke tracks we use – practice first with the demos in the Online Resources of your Siren Singers accounts):

Gift of a Friend

Fly to Your Heart – find this one in Siren Singers Online Resources

SHOES

ACCESSORIES:

  1. Fairy Wings

COSTUME:

  1. Pixie Fairy Corset Dress
  2. Full Torso Corset Bra (to hold wings)
  3. Black Undershorts
  4. Green Sparkly Pixie Fairy Shoes

COSMETICS:

  1. Foundation (natural)
  2. Powder (natural)
  3. 3-toned Shadow (nudes with highlight)
  4. Eyebrow Pencil (tan)
  5. Lip Color (Bright Pinkish Red)
  6. Nails (Nude Polish or French Tips)
  7. Contacts (Blue)
  8. Black Eyeliner
  9. White Eyeliner (on bottom lid line)
  10. Black Mascara
  11. Black False Lashes (extra-long & feathery)
  12. Rosie Blush
  13. Contour

GAMES:

https://www.thespruce.com/fairy-party-games-2104589

https://www.facebook.com/heidiannhood/videos/2102249243368628/

https://www.facebook.com/heidiannhood/videos/2101870243406528/

  1. Fairy Freeze Tag
  2. Musical Mushrooms
  3. Make Your Magic Potion
  4. Free the Fairies
  5. Fairy Costume Relay
  6. I Do Believe in Fairies Tag
  7. Pin the Fairy on the Flower
  8. Pass the Pixie Dust
  9. Tinker, Tinker, Bell
  10. Fairy Mary Says
  11. Guess the Fairy?

IMPROV QUESTIONS:

  1. Have you made anything neat lately?
  2. What is the coolest lost thing you have found?
  3. Where is Periwinkle today?
  4. Where’s peter?
  5. Why don’t you like Wendy?
  6. Where are the other fairies?
  7. Why aren’t you small/why are you so big?
  8. How fast can you fly?
  9. Do you like Wendy?
  10. Why don’t you like Wendy?
  11. What have you made lately?
  12. Are you/your wings real?
  13. Can I watch you fly away?
  14. Do you go to the mainland every year?
  15. Has anything cool washed up on shore recently?
  16. What can you build?
  17. Why do you turn so red when you get angry?
  18. How are your friends Silvermist, Iridessa, and Rosetta?
  19. Are you and Vidia friends?
  20. Where is Neverland?
  21. Do you still go to Neverland?
  22. Where are all your pixie friends?
  23. How are you so big now?
  24. Is Peter Pan your boyfriend?
  25. Why do you hate Wendy?
  26. What is your favorite thing to build?

POCAHONTAS

CHARACTER STUDY

CHARACTER TEST 

POSES (or view web site)

MEET & GREETS:

Video 1

Video 2

Video 3

Video 4

Video 5

Video 6

SONGS (these are the karaoke tracks we use – practice first with the demos in the Online Resources of your Siren Singers accounts):

Just Around the Riverbend

Colors of the Wind

ACCESSORIES:

  1. Feather Head Band
  2. Feather Arm Band
  3. Leather Leg Warmers

COSTUME:

  1. Leather Dress
  2. Strapless or Silicon Bra
  3. Undershorts
  4. Moccasins

COSMETICS:

  1. Foundation (natural)
  2. Powder (natural)
  3. 3-toned Shadow (browns/blue)
  4. Eyebrow Pencil (black)
  5. Lip Color (dark purple)
  6. Nails (Nude Polish)
  7. Contacts (brown)
  8. Black Eyeliner
  9. Black Mascara
  10. Black False Lashes (feathered)
  11. Nude Blush
  12. Bronzer
  13. Contour

GAMES:

  1. Pass the Raccoon
  2. Row, Row, River
  3. Find the Magic Compass
  4. Find the Headpiece on Pocahontas
  5. Musical Statues
  6. Bubble Play
  7. Bubble Play
  8. Pocahontas, Pocahontas, who has got your compass?
  9. Pocahontas Says
  10. Princess, May I?
  11. Princess Limbo
  12. Princess Trivia
  13. Princess Puzzles
  14. Coloring Pages

IMPROV QUESTIONS:

  1. What happened to your mom?
  2. Why is Grandmother Willow a tree?
  3. Who do you like better? John Smith or John Rolfe?
  4. What happened to Jon Rolfe?
  5. Who’s your favorite friend? Meeks or Flit?
  6. What’s your dress made out of??
  7. How are Meeko & Flit doing?
  8. Where did you get your necklace?
  9. Do you have a favorite animal in the forest?
  10. Where’s your dad?
  11. Where is John Smith?
  12. How old are you?
  13. Where is Meeko and Flit? Why didn’t they come to the party?
  14. Where’s your mothers neckless?
  15. Can you talk to all the animals in the world?
  16. Do you ever hurt your feet for being bare footed all the time?
  17. Are you afraid to wear your mothers neck less because it got broken once?
  18. Can you talk to all kind of animals?
  19. What is your favorite adventure?

RAPUNZEL

CHARACTER STUDY

CHARACTER TESTS

POSES (or view web site)

STORYBOOK

MEET & GREETS:

Video 1

Video 2

Video 3

Video 4

Video 5

Video 6

Video 7 

Video 8 

Video 9

SONGS:

When Will My Life Begin

I See the Light

Healing Incantation (a cappella)

ACCESSORIES:

  1. Wig Flowers
  2. Braid Pillow

COSTUME:

  1. Purple Rapunzel Dress
  2. Petticoat (optional)
  3. Undershorts
  4. Nude Flats OR
    Nude Character Shoes

COSMETICS:

  1. Foundation (natural)
  2. Powder (natural)
  3. 3-toned Shadow (pinks & purples)
  4. Eyebrow Pencil (tan)
  5. Lip Color (light pink)
  6. Nails (Nude Polish or French Tips)
  7. Contacts (green)
  8. Black Eyeliner
  9. Black Mascara
  10. Black False Lashes (extra long)
  11. Rosie Blush
  12. Contour

GAMES:

  1. Pass the Hot Skillet
  2. Flynn, Flynn, Eugene
  3. Hide & Seek w/Pascal
  4. Pin the Nose on Flynn
  5. Tangle Your Friend
  6. Musical Statues
  7. Rapunzel, Rapunzel, who has got your skillet?
  8. Rapunzel Says
  9. Princess, May I?
  10. Princess Limbo
  11. Princess Trivia
  12. Princess Puzzles
  13. Coloring Pages

IMPROV QUESTIONS:

  1. Do you still visit the tower?
  2. Do you still send up Lanterns every year?
  3. Will your baby have magic hair too?
  4. Have you made new friends?
  5. What’s it like living in the palace?
  6. Do Maximus and Eugene get along now?
  7. Are you still trying to help Eugene break his thieving habits?
  8. What is your favorite thing to paint?
  9. What’s your favorite painting?
  10. What are you painting?
  11. What is Flynn’s favorite painting?
  12. Does Flynn still steal?
  13. What’s your favorite thing to bake?
  14. Do you still eat at the Snuggly Duckling?
  15. What’s your favorite part of being out of the tower?
  16. What’s Flynn’s favorite color?
  17. What’s your favorite song?
  18. Do Max and Eugene still not like each other?
  19. What’s your favorite part about being in the castle?
  20. Where’s Pascal?
  21. Does Flynn still steal things?
  22. Have the ruffians followed their dreams?
  23. Does the royal guard still dislike Flynn?
  24. How many frying pans do you have?
  25. Is Flynn going to be king one day?
  26. How did you learn stuff in your tower all by yourself?
  27. What happened to Mother Gothel?
  28. What is your favorite room in the castle?
  29. How often do you wear your crown?

SLEEPING BEAUTY

CHARACTER STUDY:

Sleeping Beauty

Flora, Fauna, Merryweather

CHARACTER TEST

POSES (or view web site) 

STORYBOOK

MEET & GREETS:

Video 1

Video 2

Video 3

Video 4

Video 5

SONGS (these are the karaoke tracks we use – practice first with the demos in the Online Resources of your Siren Singers accounts):

Once Upon a Dream

I Wonder

 ACCESSORIES:

  1. Royal Gold Tiara
  2. Royal Gold Necklace

COSTUME:

  1. Royal Pink Dress
  2. Petticoat
  3. Strapless or Corset Bra
  4. Undershorts OR
  5. White Tights
  6. Gold Flats OR
  7. Gold Character Shoes

COSMETICS:

  1. Foundation (natural)
  2. Powder (natural)
  3. 3-toned Shadow (pinks/mauves/purples)
  4. Eyebrow Pencil (tan)
  5. Lip Color (pinks/reds)
  6. Nails (Nude Polish or French Tips)
  7. Contacts (violet)
  8. Black Eyeliner
  9. Black Mascara
  10. Black False Lashes (extra long)
  11. Rosie Blush
  12. Contour

GAMES

  1. Pass the Enchanted Pillow
  2. Blue, Blue, Pink
  3. Find the Chocolate Kisses
  4. Pin the Crown on the Princess
  5. Sleeping Tag with Maleficent
  6. Musical Statues
  7. Aurora, Aurora, who has got your pillow?
  8. Aurora Says
  9. Princess, May I?
  10. Princess Limbo
  11. Princess Trivia
  12. Princess Puzzles
  13. Coloring Pages

IMPROV QUESTIONS:

  1. What are Flory, Fauna, and Merriweather doing today?
  2. Has Prince Philip done anything romantic lately?
  3. Do you prefer your pink or blue dress?
  4. Do you kiss the prince? (from an actual child)
  5. Do you like pink or blue better?
  6. Are you still friends with the animals?
  7. Are spinning wheels allowed in the kingdom now?
  8. Do you get along with your parents now that you know them?
  9. Are you happy to be a princess now?
  10. What dress color is your favorite?
  11. Why did you let a stranger kiss you?
  12. Where you mad when you realized your 3 mothers were not your real mothers?
  13. How did you feel when you found out you were a princess?
  14. Which dress is your favorite the pink or blue?
  15. Why were you sleeping?
  16. Is Maleficent still alive?
  17. Where’s your prince?
  18. Where are your fairies?
  19. What do the fairies do now that they aren’t taking care of you?
  20. What happened to Maleficent’s minions?

SNOW PRINCESS

CHARACTER STUDY

CHARACTER TEST

POSES (or view web site)

STORYBOOK

MEET & GREETS:

Video 1

Video 2

Video 3

Video 4

Video 5

Video 6

Video 7

Video 8 

Video 9 

SONGS (these are the karaoke tracks we use – practice first with the demos in the Online Resources of your Siren Singers accounts):

For the First Time in Forever

Do You Wanna Build a Snowman

For the First Time in Forever (Reprise)

True Love – from the Broadway show, find in Online Resources of Siren Singers account

HOLIDAY SONGS:

When We’re Together

Ring in The Season

ACCESSORIES:

  1. 3 ribbon Hair Clip
  2. Coronation Necklace
  3. Gold Stud Earrings (optional)

COSTUME:

  1. Coronation Ball Gown
  2. 7 Hoop Skirt
  3. Corset or Strapless Bra
  4. Undershorts OR Black Tights
  5. Gold Character Shoes

COSMETICS:

  1. Foundation (natural)
  2. Powder (natural)
  3. 3-toned Shadow (Nudes)
  4. Eyebrow Pencil (auburn)
  5. Freckles
  6. Lip Color (Brownish Red)
  7. Nails (Nude Polish or French Tips)
  8. Contacts (green)
  9. Black Eyeliner
  10. Black Mascara
  11. Black False Lashes (extra long)
  12. Rosie Blush
  13. Contour

GAMES

  1. Pass the Frozen Snowman
  2. Snowy, Snowy, Frozen
  3. Hide & Seek w/Olaf
  4. Find the Chocolate Kisses
  5. Pin the Carrot on Olaf
  6. Wrap the Snowman
  7. Bubble Play
  8. Anna, Anna, who has got your snowman?
  9. Snow Princess Says
  10. Princess, May I?
  11. Princess Limbo
  12. Princess Trivia
  13. Princess Puzzles
  14. Coloring Pages

IMPROV QUESTIONS:

  1. Do you want to build a snowman?
  2. What is your favorite kind of chocolate?
  3. What is Kristoff doing today?
  4. What’s your favorite kind of sandwich?
  5. Do you and Kristof go for rides in the sled?
  6. Do the people like having the gates open?
  7. Does Olaf eat carrots?
  8. Do the trolls come to the palace?
  9. Do you get colds?
  10. What’s your favorite chocolate?
  11. Did it hurt when you were frozen?
  12. Why do you still have the white streak in your hair?
  13. How do you not get cavities from all the chocolate you eat?

SNOW QUEEN

CHARACTER STUDY

CHARACTER TEST

POSES (or view web site)

STORYBOOK

MEET & GREETS:

Video 1

Video 2

Video 3

Video 4

Video 5

Video 6

Video 7

Video 8 

Video 9 

SONGS (these are the karaoke tracks we use – practice first with the demos in the Online Resources of your Siren Singers accounts):

Let It Go

Monster – see your Siren Singers Online Resources

Dare to Dream – see your Siren Singers Online Resources

Do You Wanna Build a Snowman

For the First Time in Forever

For the First Time in Forever (Reprise)

HOLIDAY SONGS:

When We’re Together

Ring in the Season

ACCESSORIES:

  1. Snowflake Pins
  2. Small Dangle Earrings (optional)

COSTUME:

  1. Icicle Dress
  2. Strapless or Corset Bra
  3. Undershorts OR
  4. White Tights
  5. Silver Flats OR
  6. Silver Character Shoes

COSMETICS:

  1. Foundation (natural)
  2. Powder (natural)
  3. 3-toned Shadow (Purples)
  4. Eyebrow Pencil (tan)
  5. Lip Color (deep pink)
  6. Nails (Nude Polish or French Tips)
  7. Contacts (blue)
  8. Black Eyeliner
  9. Black Mascara
  10. Black False Lashes (extra long)
  11. Rosie Blush
  12. Contour

GAMES

  1. Pass the Frozen Snowman
  2. Snowy, Snowy, Frozen
  3. Hide & Seek w/Olaf
  4. Find the Chocolate Kisses
  5. Pin the Carrot on Olaf
  6. Wrap the Snowman
  7. Bubble Play
  8. Elsa, Elsa, who has got your snowman?
  9. Snow Queen Says
  10. Princess, May I?
  11. Princess Limbo
  12. Princess Trivia
  13. Princess Puzzles
  14. Coloring Pages

IMPROV QUESTIONS: 

  1. Is Olaf enjoying the warm weather?
  2. What is your favorite thing about having ice powers?
  3. What is it like to have the gates open all the time now?
  4. Are you throwing a ball at the castle?
  5. Do you approve of Kristof and Anna?
  6. Is it hard being the queen?
  7. Does Olaf eat carrots?
  8. Do the trolls come to the palace?
  9. Do you get colds?
  10. Where’s Anna?
  11. Can you show us your powers right now?
  12. How did you get here?

SNOW WHITE

CHARACTER STUDY

CHARACTER TEST

POSES (or view web site)

MEET & GREETS:

Video 1

Video 2

Video 3

Video 4

Video 5

Video 6

SONGS (these are the karaoke tracks we use – practice first with the demos in the Online Resources of your Siren Singers accounts):

Some Day My Prince Will Come

With a Smile & a Song

Whistle While You Work

ACCESSORIES:

  1. Red Ribbon Bow

COSTUME:

  1. Snow White Dress
  2. Petticoat
  3. Undershorts OR
  4. White Tights
  5. Black Character Shoes

COSMETICS:

  1. Foundation (natural)
  2. Powder (natural)
  3. 3-toned Shadow (browns)
  4. Eyebrow Pencil (black)
  5. Lip Color (cherry red)
  6. Nails (Nude Polish or French Tips)
  7. Contacts (brown)
  8. Black Eyeliner
  9. Black Mascara
  10. Black False Lashes (extra long)
  11. Red Rosie Blush
  12. Contour (Intense Highlights)

GAMES:

  1. Pass the Sleepy Pillow
  2. Grumpy, Grumpy, Happy
  3. Find the Magic Apple
  4. Pin the Ears on Dopey
  5. Musical Statues
  6. Snow White, Snow White, who has the magic mirror?
  7. Snow White Says
  8. Princess, May I?
  9. Princess Limbo
  10. Princess Trivia
  11. Princess Puzzles
  12. Coloring Pages

IMPROV QUESTIONS:

  1. Do you still like apples?
  2. Are the dwarves messy?
  3. What do you think about wishing wells?

WAYFINDER

CHARACTER STUDY

CHARACTER TEST

POSES (or view web site)

STORYBOOK

MEET & GREETS:

VIDEO 1

SONGS (these are the karaoke tracks we use – practice first with the demos in the Online Resources of your Siren Singers accounts):

How Far I’ll Go

How Far I’ll Go (Reprise)

ACCESSORIES:

  1. Necklace

COSTUME:

  1. Wayfinder Dress
  2. Undershorts
  3. Wayfinder Shoes

COSMETICS:

  1. Foundation (natural)
  2. Powder (natural)
  3. 3-toned Shadow (browns)
  4. Eyebrow Pencil (black)
  5. Lip Color (nude red)
  6. Nails (Nude Polish or French Tips)
  7. Contacts (brown)
  8. Black Eyeliner
  9. Black Mascara
  10. Black False Lashes (extra long)
  11. Pink Blush
  12. Contour (Intense Highlights)

GAMES:

  1. Pass Pua
  2. Tefiti, Tefiti, Teka/Float, Float, Sail
  3. Find Hei Hei
  4. Pin the Flower on Moana
  5. Freeze Dance
  6. Wayfinder, Wayfinder, who has the Necklace/Conch/Lei?
  7. Wayfinder Says
  8. Wayfinder, May I?
  9. Wayfinder Limbo
  10. Wayfinder Trivia
  11. Princess Puzzles
  12. Coloring Pages

IMPROV QUESTIONS:

  1. What does Maui do now?
  2. Do you ever visit the island of Tefiti?
  3. Do you prefer swimming or sailing?

Step 8 – Perspective

PARTY PRINCESS HANDBOOK (excerpts by M. Alice LeGrow

PROLOGUE

Party performers are a special breed. We’re part artist, part kindergarten teacher, part actor, part imaginary celebrity and part DJ. We pump the party up, do some entertaining, guide the kids through activities, kick out the jams, keep the dancing going and wrap it all up with a fun finish. The fact that our party crowd is under three feet tall and wearing Spongebob sneakers doesn’t make them any less great to entertain. The misguided visual of hard-to-please, disgruntled kids at birthdays is very rare for us. Kids are there to party! They’re ready for fun! They want to dance and sing and play games and eat pizza and go nuts. And we’re there to make sure it all happens.

But we do so much more than just party. We’re also there to bring some magic into the lives of families who can’t afford several thousand dollars to fly to far-away theme parks, or take expensive vacations. We’re there for the kids in hospitals who can’t go home for their own birthdays. We’re there for disabled children who can’t leave their homes and go to a show or a carnival, or who have special needs and require a one-on-one performer who will take the time to get to know them. We’re there at charity events to help raise money for schools, hospitals and community centers. We march in town parades, greet kids at the local ice rinks and wave to crowds at park tree-lighting ceremonies during the holidays.

Most importantly, we’re not in it for the financial rewards. Ask any veteran party performer and they’ll tell you that they endure low pay, sweating in costumes and the ridicule of just about everyone with a day job, because they love the kids. They love making kids happy. The sight of a child having their whole year made because you showed up to their party is what keeps this industry going. Sure, there are a few bad apples out there . . . the princesses who don’t realize that “princess” is just their job title, not their actual birthright; the lousy performers who think a terrible routine is “good enough for a bunch of kids”; the owner starting up a cheap character company just because they think it’ll be easy money. Every industry has some less-than-stellar members. But for the vast majority of us, doing it for the kids is what it’s all about. Being surrounded by happy little smiles and knowing that you helped make their day is the best payment you can get from this line of work. We’re not in it to be rich or famous . . . we’re in it for someone other than ourselves.

Is this the right job for you?

Did you know that for a few fleeting years, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles were mascot characters at Disney-MGM? Not many people remember that. But I remember it. My parents had taken us on our one and only family vacation to Disney World in 1992, and at the emotional apex of our trip, my little brother and I met the Turtles.

We were huge fans, growing up overseas on a military base in Europe and playing ninja turtles with the other kids on the base. The sight of those turtle mascots, live and in-person, sent me into shock, and my brother into what I can only imagine was a child-sized heart attack. We mobbed those foamy costumes, got our pictures taken, collected their autographs and generally were of the opinion that life was all downhill from that glorious moment. Deep down, we knew they weren’t real turtles. But when you’re a kid and you see a character you love, reality and fantasy blur together in a weird way. Your brain knows it’s not real, but your heart says it’s the most real thing in the world. I hugged the costumed suit of Leonardo like the last lifeboat on the Titanic.

Fast-forward to today, and I am inside a turtle mascot suit, painstakingly handmade by me to an exacting standard of “just generic enough,” so as not to infringe too much on the copyrights of my beloved childhood heroes, while still satisfying the Awesomeness quotient. I can’t believe I’ve finally made this costume and actually get to perform in it. Originally I volunteered to make it from scratch for a charity event, out of my own pocket, just for the thrill of being my favorite character. It wasn’t cheap and it wasn’t easy. I’d never even made a mascot before. But with weeks of research, saving for supplies and a lot of hard work, it was finally complete.

When at last the day came to wear it for the first time, my handler ushered me into the roomful of kids. I’d hardly gotten in the door of the venue before I felt a tugging sensation around my middle. Looking down through the quarter-sized eyehole opening, I saw a little boy hugging me around the waist as hard as he could, like he never wanted to let go.

Twenty-three years earlier, I did the same thing to another actor . . . and now here I was, in the same suit, as the same character, with a kid hugging me. It struck me that when I was the kid, I thought meeting my hero was the best feeling in life. Now that I was in the suit, I knew that sharing that kind of moment with this little boy was really the best feeling. Making a child this happy was better than meeting my heroes, or even playing them, and the strangeness of it coming full-circle from my own childhood made it somehow even better. It was hard to put into words just what I was feeling. I wish I could go back in time and tell the actor in that original turtle suit. He would have understood.

So with that sappy, feel-good anecdote out of the way, what exactly is the party performer industry?

First, a few things about what it isn’t. It’s not an industry for those looking to make easy money with little work. It’s not for people wanting to launch their acting careers. It’s not a clock-in, clock-out job that you drop the minute your scheduled time is up. It’s not for divas and people who demand the spotlight. And obviously, it’s not for people who can’t handle being around kids.

But if you’re the kind of person who loves kids and can talk to them even when they’re upset, crying or disgruntled; if you’re the kind of person who is responsible, always on time and never makes excuses at work; if you have offbeat talents and a knack for making people laugh; if you are infinitely patient, know how to keep your temper and can smile even through the most difficult and stressful moments . . . then you’re the kind of person the industry wants.

Notice that nowhere in the above paragraph does it say, “drop-dead gorgeous.” A common misconception, especially for princess performers, is that you have to be terribly good-looking to get the job. Although looks matter for some characters, the industry is not set on a seesaw of “beautiful” versus “take a hike.”

Attractiveness and youth are on a spectrum, and what kind of job you want in this line of work will slide the requirements up or down that spectrum. Princess? Well, you should definitely be at least average-looking and somewhat resemble the character for which they’re auditioning you, even if that means using a lot of makeup to do it. Mascot performer? You could be missing every tooth in your head and have five noses. So long as you can act well inside the suit and keep up your energy, you’re golden.

There is a host of other factors that are far more important than your looks. Possibly the most important factor is are you good with kids? Tolerating children or “thinking babies are cute” is not the same thing as being able to break up a tantrum, circumvent a pre-nap meltdown or draw out an incredibly shy child’s inner party animal. Most party companies will prefer an average-looking performer who is great with kids, over a stunningly beautiful performer who can’t control children at all.

My rule of thumb is that if you can’t imagine yourself as a teacher for a day, dealing with minor squabbles, spilled drinks, endless annoying interruptions and potty breaks, then you are not cut out for the job. Because although we are entertainers and technically not required to act like babysitters on top of that, we always have to deal with problems at parties, since the parents hardly ever step in to help once our performance has started. It’s up to us to keep the peace as much as possible. I’ve worked with performers who have stood like statues in corners at events, or chatted with parents while doing nothing to control the group of kids or lead them in activities. I can live without those performers, no matter how pretty they are, and so can the children.

As of the moment I write this, I’m heading toward my 34th birthday. That’s considered an advanced age for the work that I do, which is mostly princessing. The majority of other character performers I know fall between the ages of 16 and 25. But I have a young face and even though I’m literally twice the age of some of my co-workers, my boss knows that I’m great with kids and I never let an awkward pause or dull moment interrupt my work at parties. The ability to keep your audience engaged, entertained and happy is more important than being the perfect age, looking the part, or owning your own costume.

Because we play characters, many fans of licensed characters want to join the industry. Disney fans, Marvel and DC cosplayers and others who want to “be their favorite character for a living” mistakenly believe that they can act out their fantasy in this job. It’s only when they join up and find out that they’re expected to be more like a teacher than a character, that they either quit or wise up fast. Party performing is not make-believe for wannabe princesses and heroes who crave the spotlight, the audience and the shiny costume. If you’re getting into this job only to please yourself, look elsewhere. Once you put that costume on, everything you do is for the kids . . . from helping with crafts, to singing over a dozen shouting children, to cleaning errant sticky hand- prints off your outfit with a smile.

But if you really have the dedication, the determination and the motivation to make children happy, then you can succeed in this industry. There’s a place for absolutely everyone of all shapes and sizes and all the eclectic talents they bring with them. It’s a lot of work, but it’s worth it!

Self-Assessment

“Everyone has talent. It’s just a matter of moving around until you find out what it is.” ~George Lucas

Time to get down to business and do an honest review of yourself as a performer. In this section, we’ll do a self-assessment to determine your level of skill, your aptitude for certain character work, your unique abilities and what kind of role in party performing is best for you.

To start with, we’ll assume that you’re good with children. If you aren’t sure you have this most fundamental of qualities, cross off all of the following statements that apply to you:

I have babysitting experience (neighbors, younger relatives besides siblings, etc.)

I’m comfortable around lots of smaller children.

I actively engage smaller children in conversation.

I don’t lose my temper with children, even when they’re being difficult or annoying.

I genuinely like children and find them funny.

I can relate to children, listening to what they have tosay, instead of dismissing them.

I don’t “talk down” to children.

I don’t think children’s problems are less importantthan adult ones.

I know how to ask a child to do something in a kind, but firm manner

If a child gets unruly or upset, I can calmly talk them down without shouting

I’m not upset by a child sneezing, drooling or spitting up on me

I understand that children are often happy, sad, angry and scared very quickly in turn. It’s just part of being a kid and I know how to deal with it, without becoming frustrated.

People tell me I’m good with children.

If you’ve crossed off most of these items, or are confident that you could do so after a little practice, then you should be fine. That last item on the list is important . . . some people may think they’re great with kids, but really aren’t, while others who don’t think so may be surprisingly good with them.  As I like to tell people, I began this job by just needing extra money. I was recommended to try it by a friend who is also a party princess. Even though I insisted I was no good with children, everyone who knew me said I was great with them. “You had them eating out of your hand,” my dad said in amazement once, at a comic book library event I hosted for some kids ten and under. “You’re like a kid-magnet,” more than one manager has declared at most retail jobs I’ve had. “They just love you!” It wasn’t until I really listened to my friends and family that I embraced this ability to create a rapport with kids and made it the focal point of my character performing.

You don’t need to be the ultimate kid-magnet to work this job. Plenty of people start off more than a bit nervous around kids, but learn to love it. The most important qualities to have are:

Patience to deal with talkative, squirmy, or grabby kids, as well as shy kids who watch you from the corner but refuse to play, or bossy kids who want to hog your attention while everyone else gets pushed to the side. You can never lose your temper on this job, not for a moment.

Confidence to take control of the group and gently but firmly lead them through activities and routines, without letting everything descend into chaos. You must be a leader and make sure that everything is done fairly and peacefully, without arguments or conflict. It’s your job to set the tone and pace of the activities.

Compassion, because kids are kids, not adults. They don’t understand the world as we do. They make mistakes and don’t realize it. They bump their head on something and cry for twenty minutes like it’s the end of the world, only to stop immediately and be distracted by a colorful balloon. Remember that being kids doesn’t mean their pain is any less than yours, or their problems any less upsetting. Something a parent might find hilarious, like a kid’s pants falling down in the middle of a dance, may be humiliating to the child in question. Compassion will help you see the world as they do and understand their fears, their insecurities and their needs. Once you know that you have the intellectual and emotional skills needed to work with children on a regular basis, we can look at some other requirements for the job.

Are you physically capable of doing the work?

Something that doesn’t often get brought up is the issue of the physical demands of this kind of work. A character performer skipping around and waving to all the children may look happy and at ease, but they’re likely battling a heavy or restrictive costume, profuse sweating, uncomfortable shoes or the back pain of being asked to lift and hold 30-lb. children over and over for tons of photo-ops. If you have back and/or neck problems, difficulty standing for long periods of time, are highly susceptible to heat stroke or exhaustion, or don’t have a lot of physical stamina, then this job may not be right for you. I was in a car accident about a year after I started my work as a performer, and even after physical therapy, I couldn’t work a party for months. I still have trouble to this day because of lingering back problems, so I have to decline to lift children and sometimes turn down longer or more difficult events. It’s not an easy job to do, unless you stay in shape.

The requirements of some jobs within party performing can limit the types of roles suited to those with disabilities. However, there are still roles available to those who have trouble walking or who have other difficulties that may keep them from actually playing a character. Face-painters often work seated and stationary, as well as do some balloon artists. There are also always positions for hosts and hostesses, who are assistants that set up the party items beforehand, act as a liaison with the parents or venue owners, help the character performer or mascot between sets, set up and hand out crafting or activity items, collect pay from the clients and clean up any party items or props before departure. Hosts can also double as face-painters at parties, or do small activities like glitter tattoos and nail-painting. Hosting is a very important job and a vital role for larger parties or events. You may be required to carry large plastic tote bins or rolling luggage full of props and supplies, but for much of the party you will remain seated and out of the way of the performance, so it’s not as physically demanding.

Can you deal with the emotions that inevitably come from interacting with sick children, disabled children, dying children?

One very important aspect about being a character performer is that we do a lot of charity work. Party performers are sometimes hired to work at hospitals or other locations where the children to be entertained are disabled or seriously ill. More often than not, though, we’re asked to perform on a volunteer basis at these places. No one will tell a company that they must do it. It’s not a legal requirement. It’s just implicitly understood that every company gives back to the community as much as possible and this way of thinking is endemic to the industry. We do it because it’s just what we do. Every year, hundreds of thousands of dollars in free appearances, parties and giveaways are donated to hospitals, charity foundations and individual families in need.

What this means to you is that as a performer, you may be expected to volunteer occasionally for one of these events. Nearly every performer I know jumps at the chance, even though they don’t get paid anything for it. Who wouldn’t want the opportunity to make a sick child happy for a day?

But many first-time performers aren’t emotionally prepared for their first encounter with sick or disabled children. Some people who are great with healthy kids are conversely terrible with seeing children in pain. It’s not something with which they can comfortably deal. When you do a hospital visit, you will inevitably be confronted by very sick children, some of whom will undoubtedly not survive their illness. If you regularly visit the same hospitals, as I do, you will learn not to inquire after certain patients you met the last time, because they may be deceased or transferred to another hospital for more specialized treatment.

It’s a hard lesson to learn and some people may just know instinctively that they’re not cut out for it. This doesn’t mean that you can’t be a party performer, but you should make your eventual employer aware of this and offer to help out with charity efforts in some other way – by distributing fliers, helping assemble gift bags, acting as a driver for other performers and so on.

You may also be hired to work with special-needs children on a fairly regular basis. Lots of families with special-needs children bring entertainment to their home because their child can’t physically go to a theme park, has trouble socializing outside of the home, or has emotional limitations that make it hard for them to enjoy public venues. I’ve done parties for kids with Down syndrome, children with hearing and sight problems and even a set of three autistic siblings. You need to have extra-special patience, understanding and focus when dealing with special-needs children, who may be startled or afraid of strangers, or may need limited-stimulation activities in order to feel comfortable and focused. These are things you’ll discuss with your boss when training for the job. For now, just be aware that it’s something you may eventually have to do as part of your work.

Can you control a large group of children and speak commandingly, but nicely?

Are you naturally shy and don’t like telling people what to do? Unfortunately, about half of a party performer’s job involves telling children what to do, or asking them nicely. We never say the word “no” or give direct orders, but we are still responsible for making sure the children follow our direction. “Can we all sit in a circle now?” “Can everyone have a seat at the cake table?” “Can everybody get their listening ears on for the story?” “Can we all stand up and get ready to dance?” “Can we be quieter so everyone can hear the song?” We always phrase it as a question aimed at the entire group, but there should never be any doubt that it’s a very gentle order, not a request. Children need structure, even at a party, which is what we provide: structured and planned entertainment.

Even if you’re just at a meet-and-greet, waving and taking photos, you need to know how to tell a child what to do, if only for their own safety. “Can we please be careful with that?” is something you need to learn how to say to a child who is playing with sound equipment, or pulling at your costume and threatening to tip you over onto themselves, or making towards the table with the cake-cutting knife lying on it. You’re not bossing children when you tell them what to do at a party. You’re making sure that the event goes as planned and that all the activities have a time and place to happen, so everyone has the maximum amount of fun with the least number of mishaps.

Beginning Your Bookings

Congrats, you’ve got the job! Now it’s time to buckle down and start learning the business quickly, so you can begin booking and making money. Since this job is quite different from clocking in at the office every morning, there are some things you should know first about what to expect.

At the Hub

To start, most party company activity revolves around the home base, or Hub. This location is where character performers come to meet and change, where hosts retrieve their daily supplies of games, crafts and paints, where all the costumes and props are stored and often where paychecks may be left for pick-up. The Hub is usually located at the owner’s own house or in a rented business space. It may be as simple as a renovated basement, or as elaborate as a separate store-front, with a backstage area and a front shop space for hosting parties.

Wherever it’s located, the Hub is where you will report on work days, to suit up in costume and apply any makeup or details. Your boss will give you start times for each gig (which is when you are expected to actually enter each party), but also may either build time into the schedule for your arrival and changing at the Hub, or require you to arrive at a certain specific time beforehand. You should know where the Hub is located, exactly how long it takes you to get there from your house (with and without traffic) and what the rules are for entry. Is it only unlocked at certain times or on certain days? If it’s in a house, can you just walk in, or will that disturb family members? Is there a hidden key around outside? Find out exactly how you gain entry to the Hub and what that will mean for your routine. You may have to wait in the morning until the boss arrives to unlock the doors. Or she may leave the doors open and you can come and go as you please. Whatever the setup, be sure to give yourself plenty of time to arrive without being late, especially in light of traffic. “There was traffic on the way” is an excuse that doesn’t hold water at most companies. Performers are expected to account for it and leave lots of extra time for travel, as well as to check online sources for travel updates along their route.

Respecting the Communal Space

Inside the Hub, there will be a specific storage system for every item you use on the job. Costumes will be hung up, wigs will be stored and props will be sorted, all in their proper places. You will be expected to follow the rules of maintenance and not leave costumes on the floor, or accessories in pockets, or shoes strewn about. There may be days when you have to run back to the Hub and hurriedly change into a new costume for a second or third party, leaving no time to clean up. But always remember to tidy up your mess at the end of the day, when all the parties are finished. This is especially true of any cosmetics tables, which often become a wreck after half a dozen performers have messed about with them in the morning. Put things back just the way you found them, and it’ll cut down on delays for everyone.

Be sure to always hang up your costume neatly and inform your boss if there are any tears, stains or damage she should know about. Replace your wig on a wig stand or wherever you got it from. Collect up hair pins and safety pins, putting them all back where they belong. Put props and accessories away in their own bins. Remember, you’re not just setting things right for your boss, but for all the performers who have to share the space with you.

It pays to get used to changing in front of others, since that’s undoubtedly what you’ll be doing. You’ll often be expected to change in front of people of the opposite sex as well, so if you’re shy, wear leggings and an undershirt beneath your costume.

A boss may require performers to wear tank tops or other underclothes, to protect the costumes from sweat and keep it from showing through while performing. You should also bring your own stick-on dress shields and adhere them inside the underarms of the costume to minimize any sweating damage. Just be sure to remove them before you leave for the day!

Costumes

Costumes are dispensed based foremost by character, then by size. Since most of the costumes will be one size fits most, a lot of lacing and adjusting may go into making the costume fit you. There will also be shoes that likely will be in a few standard sizes. They may not fit you perfectly, and if you can clear it with your boss to supply your own shoes, you’ll avoid the pain of wearing too-tight shoes for the day.

Whatever you can do to prepare before you arrive will help get you out the door and to your gig faster, as well as take up less time at the changing station and the makeup mirror, so other performers can use them. Most people apply almost all of their makeup at home, and just do a few final touches with rouge and false lashes after getting into costume. It’s also more sanitary to carry and use your own makeup, even if your boss provides some for you. It cuts down on swapping bacteria among performers.

You usually won’t have more than twenty minutes to get into costume and you may not even get a chance to return to the Hub for a change later in the day, so second and third costumes may have to be brought with you in garment bags, so that you can change in the car or a bathroom. Be sure that you bring all the items for these later costumes, including matching shoes and props!

Makeup and Wigs

Applying character makeup is very necessary. I see a lot of posts online from younger party performers who say, “I don’t need to wear makeup with my costumes, as I have a flawless complexion already!”

It’s kind of a silly insult to insinuate that the reason all the rest of us are wearing makeup is to hide bad complexions. We’re wearing it because it goes with the costume. If you have a large, colorful costume on, plus a wig, your plain and un- adorned face is going to look oddly washed-out in comparison, especially in photos. There will be a significant visual imbalance between your face and the rest of you. When you see us troweling on rouge, it’s not to look younger or prettier, but to help our faces keep pace with the costumes. It also helps us mold our faces to better resemble the character. I know when I take my wig off after a gig, I laugh at how overly made up and heavy-handed my face looks, with all that character makeup on it. But when I put on my wig without doing my makeup first, my face seems to shrink into the wig and my features look tired and less distinct.

For those reasons, makeup is essential and should never be skipped for a character. And since you’re always being photographed by parents, you need makeup in order to make your features stand out and not get washed away by flash photography, bad lighting, or just a lousy camera. Even male characters can do with a few touch-ups of foundation to even out their skin and a darkening of the eyes and eyebrows with powder or liner, to make them stand out better.

If you’re not confident in your makeup skills, ask another performer or your boss to help you. Just realize that you will be expected to learn quickly and do your own makeup, as others may not always have time to help you and do their own makeup as well. Character makeup tutorials online will help you greatly in learning how to nail down your look, as well as do tricky things like apply colored contacts and false lashes.

Be sure to use a lip liner pen and a brush for a nice, smooth lipstick application, and keep pieces of paper handy with you to blot your lipstick on in the car, just before entering parties. I always end up with lipstick on my teeth, so I make a habit of rubbing my tongue over the front of my teeth every few minutes during a party, while my back is turned to the children.

As for wigs, they’re easily put in place and shouldn’t move around on your head, so long as you remember to check the elastic straps in the back inside band of the wig. Little plastic hooks on the straps should connect to a row of tiny ribbon loops, allowing you to widen the wig, or cinch it smaller. Always use a wig cap to tuck your hair and keep it in place. I recommend open-top netting caps, as they’re much better for your hair than the usual pantyhose-like caps. Avoid making your own hair into a ponytail or braid first, if you can possibly avoid it, as it creates lumps under the wig.

Put your wig on by holding it in the front center of the hairline with one hand and the very back center with the other. Apply the back of the wig to your head first, positioning it and then pulling down on the front to snug it into place. Once it’s in place, check the back of the wig again and pull it down at the root, to make sure it covers all of your own hair. Little tabs on either side of the wig that correspond with where natural sideburns would be can be found underneath the hair. Pull on these and center the wig by adjusting them to right in front of your ears, so that the wig is centered. Always be sure to use matching-color hair pins to secure your wig. Even if you’re sure it won’t fall off by itself, put two or three pins in at the sides to prevent kids from grabbing and pulling your wig off mid-party. Make sure the wig hair doesn’t hang in your face or get caught in your lip gloss. I recommend doing makeup first, then your wig. Otherwise you’ll struggle to keep wig hair out of your face while trying to apply makeup.

An Average Day

During a day of parties (usually a Saturday or a Sunday), you can expect to do anywhere from one to five parties in a single day. I usually burn out after four, but I know some performers who regularly do up to six. However, the average is usually from one to three events per day. If you have multiple parties, remember to bring a bottle of water and some small snacks like granola bars and other portable sources of fast energy, because you’ll get very hungry in between gigs! Many bosses discourage performers from eating while in costume, in order to protect the outfits from spills. So you will often eat in between changing for the next party, or throw a towel across the lap of your costume and eat only things that don’t stain, like crackers or nuts. Meatball subs are not the best idea for a snack item.

You or the party host will have a list of all the clients for the day, their contact numbers and the name and age of the birthday child. This is essential, because greeting the child by name and showing that you know how old they’re turning that day is standard for the business.

More importantly, you must remain in character as much as humanly possible. Remember that as long as you have the costume on, you are that character to absolutely everyone, even with a second costume visibly in tow. If a child asks what you’re doing in the local gas station, tell them you’re visiting from your kingdom and wanted to see the town. If you have the time to stop and pose for pictures with kids who really want one, by all means do so. It may seem ridiculous to stay in character for a bunch of strangers who aren’t even paying you, but you never know how many may be future customers. And every action reflects on your company, so avoid swearing, shouting or acting rude while in costume. Behave just as you would if you were at an event.

Keep cards for your company handy while in public and give them out to curious people, with your name and title written on the back of each card (for example, Princess Bethany or Pirate Josh). Referrals from employees can translate into bonus pay from your employer and lets your boss know that you’re working hard to help with promotion.

On the Road

Using your own vehicle is a lot more convenient than being hauled around in the party wagon or the host’s car, but you have to be prepared for lots of different situations which may arise. Always gas up your car the night before a day of parties.

Every precaution must be taken to be sure that you arrive on time, or with time to spare. Lateness is not tolerated on the job…

Parents who have promised their child a visit at 3:00 don’t want to hear you calling up to complain about traffic and giving a revised ETA of 3:30. It may seem trivial, but many parties include guests and family members who can’t stay for the entire party, but definitely want to be present when you arrive. There’s also a small window of time during which young children stay happy and cooperative at parties, before they get tired and cranky and need a nap. And it’s a very poor reflection on the whole company if you constantly arrive a few minutes late to every event.

In order to get there on time, give yourself a very generous window for travel. My minimum for a route that expects no traffic jams is an extra twenty minutes on top of estimated travel time, and I check MapQuest (which always seems to give much shorter travel estimates) against my GPS (which seems more accurate). I also print a paper copy of the direc- tions to make sure I know where I’m going, even if I lose GPS or phone satellite. I also include the parent name and phone number, child’s name and age on the paper for reference.

Twenty minutes seems like a lot of time to kill, especially if you don’t think there will be traffic. But I’ve yet to arrive at more than five parties with lots of time to spare. I always seem to need the extra time to get around traffic, to deal with unexpected roadblocks or to cope with weather. If it’s close to rush hour or I know there will be traffic on the route, I automatically bump the extra time to 30 minutes or more.

Even if you arrive ten minutes early, that’s a good ten minutes you can spend in your car, fixing up your costume or makeup and rehearsing songs or standard greetings. So always err on the side of being early!

Reimbursement

You should always keep receipts from tolls and gas for your boss, and for your own records. Your boss will usually compensate you for unusual distances traveled, as well as any tolls. As for yourself, you’ll have to account on your yearly taxes for all the income you earn through this job, but you can deduct expenses like supplies and vehicle wear and tear. The government will allow an automatic deduction of 15 cents per every mile you travel for work, to cover the cost of maintenance on your car. So keep a good record of every single party you do and what the total mileage was for each day. I have a very small notebook on my desk in which I record every party, including information like the date, location, what I was paid, if I received a tip and how many miles I drove. At the end of the year, I can consult this book for my taxes.

In the Ranks

Working as a character performer means being part of a team. Many performers will have to work together at events, playing off each other’s characters and providing synchronized entertainment.

Even if your character is a robot and your partner is a fairy, you will have to work as if you have something in common. Don’t ignore your partnered performer just because your characters are from different genres. Work as a team and help each other out when kids ask tricky questions, or the group gets unruly. Team players are vital to a party company and those who can’t get along will quickly find themselves without a job. So remember that if you’re dressed as a glamorous princess, the other glamorous princess in the room is no less important than you, even if their character is less popular with kids. Never order a partner around, but always ask politely if they can help you with an activity and maintain the image that you are the best of friends.

Partnering with Other Companies

Occasionally, a well-meaning event planner will book performers from your company alongside performers from another company, sometimes your direct competition, often without telling you. Nothing’s more infuriating than arriving at an event to see some strange characters already there. Clients never seem to get the idea that we don’t like to work with our competition. Financial rivalry aside, character performers are very protective of the photos that are taken of them on the job, because our image and reputation online depends almost entirely on these pictures. If you book us next to a terrible company with awful costumes and photos of both of us together start to circulate online, parents always assume we’re both from the same company, and that those awful costumes are our costumes. Different companies have different standards and they hate to be mixed and mistaken for each other.

Worst of all are the penny-pinching planners who decide to save money on a character or two by getting a relative or friend of the family to play them, in a bad Halloween costume. I know a lot of companies who, while not exactly storming out of the party, will do everything in their power to distance themselves from that person and not be captured in photos with them. This may seem petty and cruel, but our digital media is our livelihood. When a customer sees a badly- dressed girl in a second-rate costume with our company tagged on Facebook, our reputation takes a nosedive. Added to which, we can’t control the actions of performers who don’t work for us. If someone shows up drunk, makes inappropriate jokes, is a terrible singer, or behaves badly in a public space, we can’t stop them. And it reflects right back on our own company.

There have even been cases of unscrupulous rival companies taking joint photos from events and posting them on their own social media, passing our actors and costumes off as their own. It’s an underhanded, unprofessional thing to do, but it happens.

Believe me, we don’t like to alienate the poor girl whose uncle talked her into dressing up as a bargain-bin Sleeping Beauty, or the brand-new party company that hasn’t been able to save up for good costumes yet. They probably feel extremely self- conscious among veteran performers who have expensive costumes and a killer routine. We will do everything in our power to be nice and friendly to them before and after the event, but for the sake of our company, we cannot be photographed together.

Beside all that, it’s just hard to establish a rapport with a performer you don’t know, or to decide what activities to do if your respective companies have completely different routines. Different companies have different modes of acting that they instill in their characters and we can’t account for that. At best, we end up looking awkward and forced with each other, which does not make for a perfect party for the children.

If you find that you unexpectedly have to work with a rival company, be polite and accommodating by working with them in any activity, but discreetly try to get your boss’ or host’s opinion on whether you should be in photos with them, or whether your characters should be unusually busy on the other side of the event at all times. Ultimately that’s a call only your boss can make, much like the angry call she’ll make later to the clueless event planner.

Reporting Illness and Emergencies

Getting sick happens to all humans, but most especially to party performers. Colds and fevers abound in this profession, because we’re around children and invariably catch any little thing they may be carrying. Much like teachers, we have a reputation for getting sick from little kids frequently. But unlike teachers, we see a different group of fifteen or twenty kids up to four times on weekends, meaning we’re exposed to as many as eighty brand-new children every single week, or three hundred and twenty new children a month, or three thousand, eight hundred and forty different children a year. That’s a lot of potential colds.

I always like playing Cinderella, because she has long gloves that cut down on how much skin contact I have with the kids. But the fact is that no matter how protective your costume, children will hug you, kiss you, sneeze and cough on you and even wipe their noses on you. Sometimes they lick you for absolutely no reason at all. There’s just no way to avoid being constantly exposed to illness.

Because of this, and because it’s unthinkable to do a party while sick and risk infecting a child or infant, we have to be very careful to have backups in place for emergencies. The moment you feel a bit under the weather or a cold coming on, you must tell your boss. Working sick as a party performer is not just unethical, it’s actually much harder than just showing up sick to your office or retail job. Your face looks bad, your energy flags, your voice sounds awful and your entire performance will definitely suffer. Everyone will be able to tell that you’re sick and the parents will not be pleased. I don’t even want to know what would happen if you barfed on a child. A lawsuit, probably.

Even if you really need the money, or you think you might get better by the time of the party, tell your boss when you feel something coming on. A backup must be put in place, just to be sure. I once had a cold come up the morning of the party itself. I felt fine the day before, but just a short time before the gig (halfway through doing my makeup for it, in fact), I was struck with a terrible stomach pain that later turned into a fever in a matter of hours. Luckily, my boss happened to have someone who could cover for me. Don’t take chances . . . always report in the minute you feel sick, even if it’s days before the party. Better to cancel and let someone healthy do the party, than to sniffle your way through a gig and later get a furious call from a mom who insists you made her child sick.

Moving Up in the Ranks

There’s always room for advancement at a party company. New performers who dedicate themselves to their work and are diligent in promoting the company will find that they are given more bookings as time goes on. A lot of companies often have more performers on call than they do available bookings, so priority for work is given to veterans and the most reliable of the group. By always being on time, getting good feedback from clients and doing your best to work well with your boss and your co-workers, you can eventually become one of the go-to performers for the company and will get a lot more work, raises and priority gigs for your trouble.

ON THE JOB

Character performing isn’t just a matter of showing up in costume and waving! You need to be skilled in improv, storytelling and acting for each particular character, as well as knowing the rules of the business and how to work with your specific company and its other employees. Your behavior and routine must be tailored for each event, from tiny household parties to large, community-sponsored appearances.